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chibiusaidwhat asked: so what's the appropriate terms to use instead of 'oriental'? and why is 'oriental' considered as racist and offensive? I thought it was a common term since it's widely used


Answer:

thisisnotjapan:

From Ellen Oh- 

Please don’t call me Oriental

The other day an old man made a comment to me that my oriental children were well mannered. I said thank you and tried not to let the oriental comment bother me. After all, he is from a different generation where oriental was the correct term to use for Asians. But it got me to thinking about the word and why it bothered me and I started doing some research and stumbled upon a forum with over 10 pages of back and forth on why it was insulting or why it was ridiculous. And the one comment that really upset me was when someone said “Oriental offensive? Since when did we let foreigners dictate how to use our language?”

It is a telling comment. Its roots based in the notion that Asians are foreigners. The term “oriental” comes from the “orient” which refers to the east. A term that was based on the Eurocentric belief that the Orient was a barbaric and exotic place east of Europe. It is why the word itself is considered derogatory, for it casts “orientals” as different, as foreigners. And when you think of yourself as American, being reminded that you are “foreign” hurts.

When I first started having conversations about race with my children, they would ask me if they should tell people they are Korean. I said no, you say you are American. “But I can’t say that,” my then 6 year old said. “They say I don’t look American.” I think as a parent, there are moments that just break your heart because you want to protect your children from the harsh realities of life and you find that you just can’t.

The reality is that my kids, me, my sister, my husband - we are as far from being Korean as we are from being Egyptian or Russian. We might look like a Korean and pass for one on the streets of Seoul, but as soon as we open our mouths, our Americanism pours right out. Not just in what we say or how we say it. But in how we think, walk, laugh, carry ourselves, etc. For someone to say “You’re not American because you don’t look like one.” Well then, you might as well strip us of our complete identity. It’s like every time someone shouts out “Go back to your own country!” Something inside of us dies just a little bit.

This past spring, youngest came home from kindergarten deeply upset. When I asked her what was wrong, she explained that she was sitting at lunch with 2 of her friends H and M, who are both blond and blue-eyed. Two boys were sitting across from them and were commenting on how pretty H and M are, listing how pretty their eyes were and their long hair, etc. They then turned to youngest and began to comment on how ugly she was in comparison. Youngest was devastated. I was proud of her for standing up to them. Telling them to stop or she would move to another table. When they didn’t stop, she made good on her threat and moved away. I was proud of her for taking a stand, but my heart broke for her. She asked me if she really was ugly because she didn’t have blonde hair and blue eyes. “No,” I said, “you are beautiful inside and out but some people just are blind and can’t see a diamond shining so bright in front of them. But that’s ok. It’s their loss so don’t even waste your time thinking about them.”

Even in kindergarten, children learn to recognize differences and to comment on them. While I did call the school and had the teacher have the boys apologize to youngest, can we really blame children for deep rooted societal prejudices? They told youngest she was ugly because she was different. Her eyes were different, her cheeks were different, even the one asymmetric dimple she has was different. I told her different is good. I hope she remembers that and never lets this become insecurity.

Many people complain that we’ve become so PC that we can’t say anything for fear of someone getting offended. To some extent, I agree with that and I don’t ask for people to be so careful with their words. But ultimately it isn’t the words that hurt but the intent behind them and sometimes the words themselves become synonymous with the intent. Calling someone oriental or making chinky eyes might not have been made with a racist intent, but the word and the action have become synonymous with an intent to be racist. So why use them? Yes we are different and I truly believe different is good. But when these differences are used as a way to stereotype people negatively, it becomes racism.

So please, don’t call me oriental. I am no devious, slant-eyed, exotic foreigner that speaks cryptically of ancient Chinese secrets. That stereotype needs to die. Help me kill it once and for all.

— 1 hour ago with 1406 notes
agentmolder:


This is mike scud the alien he was crucified 5 minutes ago reblog this or hell come to your house and crucify you

agentmolder:

This is mike scud the alien he was crucified 5 minutes ago reblog this or hell come to your house and crucify you

(via bownelix)

— 9 hours ago with 26 notes

adamnsight:

Have you ever seen brown eyes in the sun? You don’t always notice it at first but you’ll see that ‘brown’ no longer describes them. They melt into golden rays, circling an eclipse. There’s nothing boring about brown eyes, not even when the later hours encroach; they just turn into a sunset of their own. 

(via qunari-huntress)

— 9 hours ago with 196607 notes
#about me 

gotitforcheap:

little cooking tip, if your bread has mold on it just throw it in the toaster, the heat will evaporate the mold right off the bread and you will be #healthier #wealthier and #wiser 

— 9 hours ago with 35 notes
#food  #food // lmao 
porkrub:

Someone should just cut it off and run

porkrub:

Someone should just cut it off and run

(Source: yrdeadbeatboyfriend, via gotitforcheap)

— 9 hours ago with 20674 notes
#whites 

nayx:

*goes to bed at 2am instead of 5am* wow, my life is so in order right now.  i’m making such good decisions for myself and my body and my soul and im so in love with myself for doing this

(via lifeisadrag)

— 9 hours ago with 83950 notes

jakewyattriot:

I apologize if this comes off as disrespectful to Michael Brown or Trayvon Martin. Or their families. Or YOU, the reader. I’m not about that. That’s not why I drew this.

I am just really freaked out that 40% of Americans (and 47% of White Americans) do not think that the killings and violence in Ferguson ‘raise any racial issues.’ Fellow White Persons, this is our chance to learn. This is our chance to change.

When Trayvon Martin was murdered because Full Grown Men in America are frightened to violence by the presence black children, the dialogue turned very quickly into a conversation about gun control.

And gun control is an issue that deserves our attention.

But it won’t change the massive poverty in Black America. The arrest rate. The education statistics. The institutional, systemic, casual, and passive racism that plagues our country.

And it wouldn’t have saved Michael Brown.

Anyway. I’m sorry if this comes off as disrespectful or insincere or preachy. I’m sorry if my execution (or personality) gets in the way of what I’m trying to say. I am an imperfect artist, an imperfect person, and I am, undoubtedly, blinded to a million things by my own glaring whiteness. So this might be… Lord, this might be awful. I’m so sorry if it’s awful. Really.

But. I just keep thinking… Look, my wife is pregnant with our first child. A boy. We’re nervous, we’re excited, we’re SO ANXIOUS because what the hell do you do with babies? WE don’t know. But if we were a black family… in this country… we would be so terrified. Because we live in a nation that murders the children of black parents, puts it on the news WITH RIOTS AND TEAR GAS as decoration, and still half of us don’t even see it as a problem. Can you imagine that? Can you imagine bringing a child into that reality, to face the odds we lay out for black kids?

That would break me. I’ve never known anything like that. No one should ever know anything like that.

So let’s talk to our friends about race. Lets talk to our families. And when actual victims of racism try to tell us what’s going on in, say, a peaceful community protest as they are being gassed and shot at by cops WE SHOULD LISTEN TO AND BELIEVE THEM. Let’s talk to each other about this until we are all on the same page.

And then let’s turn the damn page.

(via opinionated-cheese)

— 10 hours ago with 22700 notes
#death  #ferguson 
PSA: Coming out day

bidyke:

A few of these have been making the rounds on tumblr, but I haven’t seen one that says this yet:

  • You don’t have to come out
  • You don’t have to feel pressured to come out
  • Being in the closet is not shameful
  • It’s about protecting yourself
  • If coming out will make you exposed to discrimination, rejection, harassment or violence, you are perfectly justified in staying closeted
  • If coming out day makes you feel like being closeted makes you a lesser person, don’t
  • It’s about survival and self-preservation
  • And you are awesome and fabulous no matter how few or how many people in your life know about your identity

(via opinionated-cheese)

— 10 hours ago with 1679 notes
#coming out 
how to anger an emo

crying-because-brendon-urie:

basementgee:

  • Gerald Way
  • Brendan Urie
  • Pete Wentz, lead singer of Fall Out Boy

i can hear the rage

(via stumpsclub)

— 10 hours ago with 14751 notes
#about me  #angry emo  #Patrick Stump  #lol